Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury.
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Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury.

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Published by E. J. Morten (Publishers) in Didsbury, Manchester .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Shrewsbury (England),
  • England,
  • Shrewsbury.

Subjects:

  • Historic buildings -- England -- Shrewsbury.,
  • Shrewsbury (England) -- Description and travel.,
  • Shrewsbury (England) -- Buildings, structures, etc.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Reprint of 1st ed., Shrewsbury, P. Sandford, 1808.

Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA690.S58 S65 1972
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 557 p., [4] leaves (1 fold.)
Number of Pages557
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5497182M
ISBN 10090159847X
LC Control Number73331178

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Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury: ISBN () Hardcover, E. J. Morten (Publishers), Founded in , has become a leading book price comparison site. Some Account of the Shrewsbury House of on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Paperback. The Ancient Library of Shrewsbury School was founded in by the Headmaster John Meighen, in part fulfilment of the development plan laid down in Thomas Ashton's Ordinances of It was housed in a a purpose designed building built in , in a room fitted out with presses and chained like a contemporary Oxford or Cambridge college library. The Shrewsbury Drapers Company was a trade organisation founded in in the town of Shrewsbury, Shropshire, members were wholesale dealers in wool or woollen cloth. The Company dominated the trade in Welsh cloth for many years, holding a virtual monopoly from the 16th century to the late 18th century. It lost its position when the roads were improved, making it practical for Founded at: Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England.

  The urn is/was five inches deep and four in diameter, with signs that it had once had a lid. How it came to be buried in a Herefordshire garden is not known, but some believe that it was originally placed in one of Shrewsbury’s town churches, maybe St Mary’s, and that during what the ‘Account of the Ancient & Present State of Shrewsbury’ describes as ‘the confusions of the great. account of the private educational provision from the 17th century before returning to the education of Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury (Shrewsbury, ), T. Phillips, Some Account, ; Pigot’s DirectoryFile Size: KB. Weekly Payments Book, Holy Cross, Shropshire Records, PL2/10/1/5. Accounts with fathers of illegitimate children by surname. Shropshire Records, PL2/3/5/1. Book of Orders, - Shropshire Records, PL2/2/1/1. Owen, () Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury. : Manchester. Shrewsbury's known history commences in the Early Middle Ages, having been founded c. is believed that Anglo-Saxon Shrewsbury was most probably a settlement fortified through the use of earthworks comprising a ditch and rampart, which were then shored up with a wooden stockade. There is evidence to show that by the beginning of the s, Shrewsbury was home to a nial county: Shropshire.

As one of the premier rare book sites on the Internet, Alibris has thousands of rare books, first editions, and signed books available. Eight Hundred Years of 'A Family of Ancient Gentry and Worship' (William Camden, ). Foreword by the Earl of Lonsdale. Some Account of the Ancient and Present State of Shrewsbury. by Sir Hugh Owen. Full text of "The Tunbridge Wells Guide; Or, An Account of the Ancient and Present State " See other formats. In Thomas Phillips' History and Antiquities of Shrewsbury () the author is explicit in his understanding of the origin of the name as a place of "scandalous lewdness and venery", but Archdeacon Hugh Owen's Some account of the ancient and present state of Shrewsbury () describes it as "called Grope, or the Dark Lane". As a result of.   At some date unrecorded the street was renamed Grope Lane, a name it has retained. In Thomas Phillips' History and Antiquities of Shrewsbury () the author is explicit in his understanding of the origin of the name as a place of "scandalous lewdness and venery", but Archdeacon Hugh Owen's Some account of the ancient and present state of.